Glycolysis and Krebs Cycle of Cellular Respiration
Draw the diagrams and write the numbered text below them. Add on to each diagram as shown.
MittochondrionDrawn.jpg
MittochondrionDrawn.jpg


1. Glycolysis occurs in the cytoplasm
2. The Krebs cycle occurs in the matrix
3. Electron transport occurs across the inner membrane

Glycolysis1.jpg
Glycolysis1.jpg

1. Glycolysis starts with the splitting of glucose in the cells cytoplasm.
Glycolysis2.jpg
Glycolysis2.jpg

2. The splitting of glucose uses two ATP.
Glycolysis3.jpg
Glycolysis3.jpg

3. The glucose pieces are used to make four ATP, so there is a net gain of 2 ATPs.
Glycolysis4.jpg
Glycolysis4.jpg

4. Two NADH molecules are also made.
5. The glucose pieces go to the Krebs cycle and the NADH goes to the electron transport chain

Krebcycle1.JPG
Krebcycle1.JPG

1. The Krebs cycle occurs in the matrix of the mitochondrion
2. The Krebs cycle uses the two glucose pieces from glycolysis
Krebcycle2.JPG
Krebcycle2.JPG

3. Carbon dioxide is produced as waste from the carbon in the glucose pieces. (This is the CO2 we exhale)
Krebcycle3.JPG
Krebcycle3.JPG

4. Two ATP are produced.
Krebcycle4.JPG
Krebcycle4.JPG

5. Two FADH2 and 8 NADH are produced and the hydrogen atoms in these molecules are used in electron transport.


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Cellular Respiration's Three Stages, an Overview:
Draw the diagram and write the numbered facts below it. Add on to your diagram with each additional picutre.
CellRespOviewsmall1.jpg
CellRespOviewsmall1.jpg

1. The first stage of cellular respiration is glycolysis and occurs in the cytoplasm.
2. The next two stages are the Krebs cycle and electron transport which occur in the mitochondria.
CellRespOviewsmall2.jpg
CellRespOviewsmall2.jpg

3. In glycolysis, a molecule of glucose is split in two. These two pieces will later be used by the Krebs cycle.
CellRespOviewsmall3.jpg
CellRespOviewsmall3.jpg

4. Two molecules of ATP are produce by glycolysis.
5. Two energy containing molecules of NADH are also produced that will be used in the electron transport stage.
CellRespOviewsmall4.jpg
CellRespOviewsmall4.jpg

6. The Krebs cycle occurs in the mitochondria.
7. The Krebs cycle uses the glucose pieces produced by glycolysis.
8. Two molecules of ATP are produced by the Krebs cycle.
9. Eight molecules of NADH and two molecules of FADH2 are also produced that will also be used in electron transport stage.
10. Carbon dioxide is produced as waste from the carbon in the glucose pieces. (This is the CO2 we exhale)
CellRespOviewsmall5.jpg
CellRespOviewsmall5.jpg

11. Electron transport occurs in the mitochondria and requires oxygen. (This is why we inhale O2.)
12. Electron transport produces 32 ATP and oxygen is combined with hydrogen producing water.

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Cellular Respiration Questions

Electron Transport – Overview
The electron transport stage is the process by which energy is transferred from NADH and FADH2 to ATP and occurs at the inner membranes of the mitochondria. The energy containing molecules NADH and FADH2 produced by glycolysis and the Krebs cycle are used to make ATP from ADP in this process. The process of electron transport requires oxygen. (We breath in oxygen for this reason and breath out the carbon dioxide produced in the Krebs cycle.) In this process electrons are passed across carrier molecule and their energy is used to move H+ ions across the mitochondrion's inner membrane. The movement of these hydrogen atoms back across the membrane is used to make ATP from ADP. After this the H+ ions bond with oxygen to form water molecules. This process generates 32 ATP molecules for every molecule of glucose molecule that undergoes total aerobic respiration.
Electron Transport- Details
Electron transport uses a series of molecules in a membrane that transfer electrons from one to another.
The chain of electron transport molecules and the enzyme that makes ATP are embedded in the inner membrane of the mitochondrion in folds called cristae. The electron transport uses Hydrogen atoms from NADH and FADH2 to produce ATP. To understand how electron transport produces ATP, the electrons and hydrogen atoms of NADH and FADH2 must be followed.
1. At the start of the chain a molecule of NADH gives up a hydrogen atom and becomes HAD+. The electron from this atom is passed down the chain of molecules, while the rest of it, a hydrogen ion, is passed across the membrane.
2. Farther down the chain a molecule of FADH2 gives up a hydrogen atoms and becomes FAD. The electrons from these atoms also pass down the chain, while the rest of it, another hydrogen ion, is passed across the membrane.
3. As the electrons pass down the chain and reenter the matrix, their energy is used to move more hydrogen ions across the membrane.
4. All these hydrogen ions that were move into the intermembrane space make a concentration and electrical difference from the matrix.
5. This difference causes hydrogen ions to move through the enzymes that makes ATP from ADP. The hydrogen ions return to the matrix and combine with Oxygen plus the electrons returning from being transported to make water molecules. The enzymes that make ATP are embedded in the inner membrane like the transport molecules.
ElectronTransportCut.jpg
ElectronTransportCut.jpg


*Jim- seach your work computer's hard drive for step by step diagraming of the above picture. It is also probably in a presentation (empress).